Acupuncture Sports Medicine Webinar Series

By Whitfield Reaves

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Total CPDs: 18.5
£0.00
Total CPDs: 18.5
Standard Certificate (18.5), IVAS (18.5), NCCAOM (18.5)
Access Period: Lifetime
Series Length: 18.5hrs

Series Overview

Whitfield Reaves, the author of The Acupuncture Handbook of Sports Injuries and Pain, is a frequent and popular lecturer in the US and Canada. He is one of the most influential practitioners integrating traditional acupuncture with orthopedic and sports medicine.

With the Acupuncture Sports Medicine Webinar series, practitioners can choose from 18 one-hour webinars that cover the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of common sports injury and pain syndromes of the neck and shoulder, the hip and pelvis, and the upper and lower extremity. Topics will cover injuries to tendons, including strain, tears, and the local qi and blood stagnation, now termed ‘tendinosis.’

There will be examples of muscle strain as well as ligament injuries, such as sprain and joint laxity. Treatment of the joint or joint space will be demonstrated with several common injuries. Thus, in its entirety, the practitioner will become better informed about these specific injuries, as well as learn how to formulate a treatment plan for similar types of conditions. Specific topics will include many conditions commonly seen in the acupuncture clinic, such as shoulder pain due to the supraspinatous and infraspinatous muscles, hip pain due to gluteus medius and minimus involvement, plantar fasciitis, achilles tendonitis, and frozen shoulder.

Each webinar will cover the diagnosis of the injury, integrating both western orthopedic assessment and TCM perspectives of both zang-fu (organ) and jing-luo (meridian). Local and adjacent points at the site of the injury will be discussed in detail. Distal points that are clinically indicated will also be covered. Other techniques, including empirical points, opposite side, and micro-systems, will also be part of the instruction. These protocols all use Whitfield’s unique Four-Step Approach to treatment of injury and pain.

The Treatment of Stiff Neck and Levator Scapulae

Whitfield Reaves reveals how the treatment of the levator scapulae muscle can treat stiff neck and pain.
Total CPDs: 1.5
Standard Certificate (1.5), IVAS (1.5), NCCAOM (1.5)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1.5hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

This 1.5 hour webinar features the use of advanced acupuncture techniques in the treatment of stiff neck and pain due to levator scapulae syndrome. The levator is the cause of neck and shoulder pain for a significant number of patients, and is often overlooked by the acupuncture practitioner. While levator dysfunction might not be the entire cause of pain - other points, treatments, and techniques may be necessary - the simple techniques covered in this webinar benefit many patients. As well, levator dysfunction is often a component of treatment to other injuries, such as strain to the supraspinatous and infraspinatous and other dysfunctions of the shoulder. Included in this webinar is a short introduction to the Four-Step Approach used by Whitfield Reaves in the treatment of sports injuries. These include the tendino-muscle meridians, distal points, and strategies using the opposite side and opposite extremity. Then, the anatomy of the levator scapulae, including correct patient positioning and palpation is covered. Finally, precise treatment techniques at the site of injury and the most effective acupuncture points are covered. This includes local, adjacent, and distal points. Having spent over 25 years specializing in the treatment of musculo-skeletal disorders, Whitfield's clinical experience is invaluable for practitioners working with pain.

Course Objectives

  • Identify the origin, insertion, and action of the levator scapulae muscle
  • Name 3 signs and symptoms of levator dysfunction
  • Name the major point used to directly treat the levator.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 30 min
General techniques of acupuncture used in the treatment of musculo-skeletal injuries and trauma (non-local treatment): Tendino-muscle meridians; Opposite side treatment; Opposite extremity treatment; Use of the Shu points; Use of other antiquity points; Special empirical points; Auricular points; 8 Extra Meridians.
30 min - 45 min
General review of the anatomy of the levator scapulae muscle: Origin, insertion; Action. 3. Trigger points; Pain & radiation patterns; Signs & symptoms.
45 min - 1.25 hrs
Palpation, meridians, and points of the levator scapulae muscle: SI 13, SI 14, SI 15; Palpation; Adjacent points: SI 11, SI 12, GB 21.
1.25 hrs - 1.5 hrs
Needle techniques on the levator scapulae: Proper patient position; Needle demonstration; Distal points; Cupping.

Lateral Knee Pain: Ilio-Tibial Band

Whitfield Reaves explains the most effective and reliable treatment protocols for Lateral Knee Pain.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Lateral Knee Pain: Ilio-Tibial Band Syndrome Ilio-tibial band syndrome is the most common cause of lateral knee pain, and involves pain in the lateral knee and thigh. It is a sports injury that every acupuncturist should become proficient in treating, as it is common, and responds well to acupuncture treatment. Tight ilio-tibial bands can be seen in the non-athletic population, and they respond well to the techniques discussed in this webinar. The injury is at the level of the muscles and tendons, with qi and blood stagnation in the channels and collaterals. This case is clearly Gall Bladder meridian pathology. Sometimes the diagnosis of wind (feng) may be used for the “popping” and “snapping” pain at the lateral knee. Local points including Gall Bladder 34, Gall Bladder 33, and Gall Bladder 31 often work well, especially when combined with distal points. However, treatment of the gluteus medius muscle is essential. This may be one of the most effective and reliable treatment protocols, according to the clinical experience of webinar instructor Whitfield Reaves. The location of the extraordinary point Jiankua will be described, which the practitioner will find extremely useful in this condition, as well as other hip and gluteal conditions.

Course Objectives

  • To use palpation in order to diagnose involvement of the distal ilio-tibial band.
  • To use palpation in order to diagnose involvement of the gluteus medius.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of the condition.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local zone of the distal ilio-tibial band and point Gall Bladder 33.
  • To be able to describe needle technique at the site of the gluteus medius and point Jiankua.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Review anatomy of knee.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the knee.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment techniques.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling techniques.

Anterior Knee Pain: The Patello-Femoral Joint

Whitfield Reaves discusses about Sports Medicine techniques to treat the dysfunction of the patello-femoral joint.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Dysfunction of the patello-femoral joint produces pain in the anterior knee in the region of the patella and the extraordinary points, Xiyan. It is a repetitive stress injury characterized by inflammation and irritation of the undersurface of the patella. This may progress to chondromalacia or anterior compartment osteoarthritis. Knee pain from patello-femoral joint dysfunction is the most common knee disorder encountered by the orthopedic physician. Patients with this complaint are very common to the acupuncture clinic. And while they may be runners, jumpers, or cyclists, patellar pain can be seen in all ages – even with moderate levels of activity. Understanding the complexity of the causes, and the available western treatments is important knowledge to add to the relatively simple and straightforward treatments of acupuncture. In this webinar, Whitfield Reaves will discuss some useful acupuncture sports medicine techniques to treat and manage this commonly seen condition.

Course Objectives

  • To use palpation and orthopedic tests in order to diagnose involvement of the patello-femoral joint.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of anterior knee pain.
  • To be able to describe needle technique at Xiyan and the sub-patellar region.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on two important zones of the quadriceps.
  • To know three common signs and symptoms of patello-femoral joint involvement.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the Anterior Knee.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the Anterior Knee.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of technique.

Knee Pain: The Medial Compartment

Whitfield Reaves differentiates between acute and chronic knee pain and demonstrates a technique called "Threading the opening of a joint space".
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Knee Pain: The Medial Compartment (Acute and Chronic) Acute pain, inflammation, and swelling in the medial knee is often experienced after injury or trauma in sports. It may involve sprain of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) or tear to the medial meniscus. From a meridian (jing-luo) perspective, we usually think of the three leg yin meridians – the Spleen, the Kidney, and the Liver. However, medial knee pain should be understood in terms of western orthopedic diagnosis. Your treatment plan, rehabilitation and prognosis for the patient all arise from this assessment. But most importantly, prognosis – what you communicate to the patient – is what is unique to each diagnosis. Pain, inflammation, swelling, and stiffness of the medial knee, at the joint space, is also seen as a chronic condition. This pain is often due to medial compartment osteoarthritis. Sources suggest that over 30 percent of individuals between the ages of 60 and 90 are affected by this condition in one of the three compartments of the knee. That percentage will likely increase over the next decade, and therefore its inclusion in this webinar. Commonly diagnosed as a Bi syndrome, the three leg yin meridians encompass the medial joint space. Webinar instructor Whitfield Reaves will discuss a very useful technique of “threading the opening of a joint space” in the region of Liver 8.

Course Objectives

  • To perform the valgus stress test in order to diagnose the MCL involvement.
  • To use palpation of the medial joint space.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of the medial compartment of the knee.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local zone of the medial joint space of the knee, in the region of Liver 8.
  • To know two signs and symptoms of medial collateral ligament sprain, and two signs and symptoms of chronic medial joint space arthritis.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Review anatomy of knee.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of medial knee.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment techniques.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling techniques.

The Hamstring Muscle

Whitfield Reaves explains the Sports Medicine treatment techniques used for Hamstring strain.
Total CPDs: 1
Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1), IVAS (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Hamstring strain is most commonly diagnosed under the category of accident/trauma, and is a sports injury frequently seen by the acupuncturist. The trauma is at the level of the muscles and tendons, with qi and blood stagnation in the channels and collaterals. Hamstring strain is clearly Bladder meridian pathology, although the Kidney meridian may also be involved. Occasionally, strain and muscle tightness may be a repetitive stress disorder due to the accumulation of micro-trauma. Both cases are treated with similar points and techniques. Treatment of the hamstring demonstrates the diversity of point selection for local and adjacent treatment in acupuncture sports medicine. Often, the point Bladder 37 is useful in releasing the entire hamstring group. This point is an example of “yin” techniques, needling into the space between the medial and lateral hamstrings. However, sometimes both the motor points and the trigger points are necessary. This is a “yang” technique, and involves treatment to ashi points located in the taut bands of muscle, slightly medial or lateral to the Bladder channel. Hamstring treatment is also is a good example of how simple orthopedic assessment, including manual muscle testing and passive stretching, can be integrated into the diagnostic process.

Course Objectives

  • To perform manual muscle testing that assist in the assessment of hamstring involvement.
  • To use palpation in order to diagnose hamstring involvement, differentiating between the lateral and the medial portions of the muscle.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of the hamstring strain.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the point Bladder 37
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the taut bands of the motor points and the trigger points.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Review anatomy of hamstring muscle group: Location, action, and indications for all local and adjacent acupuncture points; Bladder 36, Bladder 37, trigger points, motor points.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the hamstring muscle group: Common western diagnosis — Tendinopathy, tendonitis, strain (tears), muscle strain (pulled hamstring).
Understanding signs and symptoms: Signs and symptoms of hamstring muscle belly pathology (at Bladder 37), signs and symptoms of the hamstring tendon pathology (at Bladder 36).
Orthopedic testing for the hamstring muscle and manual muscles testing, passive stretch.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment techniques
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling techniques: Needle technique of Bladder 37 and its region (the belly of the muscle, motor point, trigger point) and Needle technique for Bladder 36 (the tendon).

Shin Splints: The Anterior Compartment

Whitfield Reaves reviews the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment techniques used for Shin Splints.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), NCCAOM (1), Standard Certificate (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Shin splints is a repetitive stress injury characterized by strain or inflammation of the anterior tibialis or other anterior compartment muscles of the leg. The site of injury may be the muscle, the tendon, or at the attachment to the periosteum and bone. The patient presents with pain and tenderness along the anterior lateral aspect of the leg just lateral to the tibia. Shin splints is the common term for anterior tibial stress syndrome. It is a frequent sports injury, as it comprises approximately 60 percent of all leg pain injuries. In this webinar, Whitfield Reaves will discuss the injury with its relatively easy diagnosis, assessment, and treatment techniques. This case is clearly Stomach meridian pathology, and sometimes the zang-fu organs are involved. It is an important injury to learn as a practitioner, as even walking and hiking can produce the symptoms.

Course Objectives

  • To perform manual muscle testing of the anterior compartment-- resisted dorsiflexion-- as part of the assessment procedures.
  • To use palpation in order to diagnose shin splints.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of the shin splints.
  • To describe the needle technique on the local zone of ahshi points between the tibia and the anterior compartment muscles.
  • To diagnose the shin splints from analysis of the patients signs and symptoms.
  • To know location and needle technique for the motor point of the tibialis anterior.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the anterior compartment: Location, action, and indications for all local and adjacent acupuncture points; Stomach 36, all points below Stomach 36, Lanweixue; Review of the anatomy.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of shin splints: Common western diagnosis — Tendinopathy, tendonitis, strain (tears), tendo-periostitis.
Understanding signs and symptoms referral pattern of the tibialis anterior, signs and symptoms of the shin splints, signs and symptoms of the anterior compartment syndrome.
Orthopedic testing for the tibialis anterior; Manual muscles testing, passive stretch.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment: Demonstration of palpation of the anterior tibialis; Demonstration of point location; Demonstration of palpation of the attachment zone medial to the Stomach meridian.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of technique: Needle technique of Stomach 36 and Lanweixue (the belly of the muscle, motor point, trigger point); Needle technique for threading along the lateral portion of the anterior tibia.

Achilles Tendonitis

Whitfield Reaves discusses the local and distal points used for Achilles Tendonitis, including a technique "threading the tendon."
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), NCCAOM (1), Standard Certificate (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Achilles tendonitis is a repetitive stress injury characterized by pain, inflammation, and swelling of the achilles tendon and its sheath. The entire calf muscle group may be affected. Achilles injury is usually mid-tendon, about 2 to 6 centimeters proximal to its attachment to the calcaneus. This is usually a repetitive stress disorder due to the accumulation of micro-trauma. However, it may occur as an acute strain. In general, acupuncture is beneficial for most patients using proper treatment described in this webinar. Instructor Whitfield Reaves will discuss the use of local needling using the “threading the tendon”, along with other adjacent and distal points. The practitioner should become much more familiar and confident with achilles tendonitis from the instruction and information of this webinar.

Course Objectives

  • To perform manual muscle testing and palpation that assists in the diagnosis of the achilles tendonitis.
  • To know two points proximal to the tendon that may be used in the treatment of achilles tendonitis.
  • To describe the needle technique of “threading the tendon” on the local zone of the achilles tendon.
  • To be able to name two important symptoms commonly reported by the patient with achilles tendonitis.
  • To know two points proximal to the achilles tendon and two points distal to the tendon useful in treating this condition.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the achilles tendon.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the achilles tendon.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling technique.

Lateral Ankle Sprain (Inversion)

Whitfield Reaves reviews various options in the Four Step approach used to treat ankle sprains.
Total CPDs: 1
NCCAOM (1), Standard Certificate (1), IVAS (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Inversion ankle sprain is characterized by pain, swelling, and bruising of the lateral ankle and foot. This common sports injury results in ligament sprain and joint inflammation from inverting or inward rolling of the ankle. It is one of the most common of all sports injuries. Ankle sprains involve injury at the level of the tendons, ligaments, and the joint. There is qi and blood stagnation in the channels and collaterals. The Gall Bladder is usually the primary meridian involved, although the Bladder and Stomach channels may also be affected. Local needling, in the region of Gall Bladder 40, may aggravate and is often avoided during the early stages of acute symptoms. Various options in the Four Step approach that Whitfield Reaves utilizes will give the practitioner numerous alternatives to local needling.

Course Objectives

  • To use palpation in order to assess the severity of a lateral ankle sprain.
  • To know two distal point treatments that may be used in the treatment of the ankle sprain.To know two proximal point treatments that may be used in the treatment of the ankle sprain.
  • To describe needle technique on the local zone of the talar sinus at Gall Bladder 40.
  • To name and locate two points on or adjacent to the peroneus longus muscle.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the ankle.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the ankle.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling technique.

Plantar Fasciitis

Whitfield Reaves discusses the Sports Medicine treatment techniques used to treat Plantar Fasciitis.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), NCCAOM (1), Standard Certificate (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Plantar fasciitis is characterized by pain and stiffness in the heel and the plantar aspect of the foot. It is usually a repetitive stress injury characterized by inflammation and irritation of the plantar fascia. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, and occurs in all types of athletic and active individuals. It is commonly seen in runners. However, walking and standing on a hard surface may also cause symptoms. The techniques discussed in this webinar have been found to be clinically useful by webinar instructor Whitfield Reaves. Needling includes the region of Kidney 1, and the attachment of the plantar fascia in the region of the extraordinary point Shimian. Because many patients with this type of heel pain have tight calf muscles, the Bladder meridian may also be involved and is commonly treated. In this webinar you will learn the treatment options that result in good clinical outcomes.

Course Objectives

  • To use palpation in order to diagnose plantar fasciitis.
  • To know two adjacent points used to treat plantar fasciitis.
  • To describe needle technique on the local zone of the plantar fascia at “medial Shimian”.
  • To describe needle technique on the local zone of the plantar fascia at Shimian in the center of the heel.
  • To know two proximal points used to treat plantar fasciitis.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the plantar surface of the foot.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the plantar fascia.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling technique.

Low Back Pain

Whitfield Reaves explains how to safely treat the Quadratus Lumborum Muscle for low back pain.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Low Back Pain: The Quadratus Lumborum Muscle Acute or chronic low back pain and spasm due to the quadratus lumborum (QL) is one of the most overlooked diagnoses by the TCM practitioner. The practitioner who integrates western anatomy and orthopedics can skillfully treat this muscle. It is commonly seen in low back pain, degenerative disc disease, and other related pain syndromes. Dr. Janet Travell calls the quadratus lumborum the “joker of low back pain”. When the QL has active trigger points or is in spasm, a wide range of pain patterns present. Pain is often one-sided, and may radiate to the gluteal and inguinal regions. Strain to the quadratus may be seen acutely, caused by movements involving lifting and twisting. Motor vehicle accidents, trauma and falls may also injure the QL. I have seen golfers, tennis players, and cyclists during hill-climbing strain the muscle due to the peculiar twisting mechanics of their sport. And chronic dysfunction may occur from poor posture and position during sleep and sitting. Treatment to the QL may be specific in acute low back sprain/strain. It may be combined with treatments for other causes of low back pain. This webinar will alert the practitioner to its involvement, and how to safely treat this rather anatomically “hidden” muscle.

Course Objectives

  • To diagnose QL involvement from observation of signs and symptoms.
  • To use precise palpation of the lumbar musculature in order to diagnose the condition.
  • To name two acupuncture points located on the affected muscle.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local points on the QL muscle.
  • To know three related conditions that treatment of the QL may be useful.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the quadratus lumborum.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the quadratus lumborum muscle.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling technique.

Shoulder Pain - The Supraspinatous Muscle

Whitfield Reaves covers the assessment and treatment of shoulder pain that is caused by supraspinatous tendonitis.
Total CPDs: 1
NCCAOM (1), Standard Certificate (1), IVAS (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Whitfield Reaves has frequently commented that there is no single injury more rewarding to treat than shoulder pain that is a result of supraspinatous tendonitis. With both trigger and motor points located in the region of Small Intestine 12, the practitioner is able to treat this rotator cuff muscle with an easy-to-master acupuncture sports medicine needle technique. However, the precarious location of the supraspinatous tendon beneath the acromion, between the points LI 16 and LI 15, may take a bit more practice to needle with precision. What makes the supraspinatous muscle problematic for the acupuncturist is that the pain often refers to the deltoid region of the shoulder, and, occasionally, distally down the arm and forearm. This deltoid region pain leads many practitioners to a diagnosis of Large Intestine (Yang ming) and San Jiao (Shao yang) disorders; this often results in treatments that rarely suffice. This one-hour webinar by Whitfield Reaves covers these issues of assessment and treatment, and clearly give the practitioner a guide to treat this common cause of shoulder pain.

Course Objectives

  • To perform two orthopedic tests that assist in the diagnosis of supraspinatus involvement.
  • To perform one orthopedic test that assists in the diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon impingement syndrome.
  • To use palpation in order to locate trigger points of the supraspinatus.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local point SI 12.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the sub-acromial zone using LI 16 and LI 15.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the supraspinatus muscle.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the supraspinatous muscle.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment - Demo of palpation of the supraspinatous, point location, and palpation of the subacromial portion of the tendon.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of technique - needle technique of Small Intestine 12, 16, and rotator cuff tendon.

Shoulder Pain - The Infraspinatous Muscle

Whitfield Reaves demonstrates the treatment of Qi and Blood Stagnation in the infraspinatous muscle.
Total CPDs: 1
Standard Certificate (1), IVAS (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

The infraspinatous muscle, with common trigger points, refers pain to the area of the deltoid and the shoulder joint. Seen both as an acute or chronic injury, inflammation of the muscle and tendon, as well as possible strain at the attachment to the humerus makes this rotator cuff muscle an important one to master. Like its adjacent muscle, the supraspinatous, this referral pattern leads many practitioners to a diagnosis of Large Intestine (Yangming) and San Jiao (Shaoyang) disorders, which often results in overlooking this scapular-region muscle. The Small Intestine meridian encompasses the belly of the infraspinatous in the region of Small Intestine 11. The area between Small Intestine 9 and 10 is the muscle-tendon junction – also a common source of pain. Treating qi and blood stagnation in the infraspinatous is described and demonstrated in detail by Whitfield Reaves in this webinar.

Course Objectives

  • To perform manual muscle testing to assist in the diagnosis of the condition.
  • To use palpation in order to diagnose stagnation at the muscle-tendon junction.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local zone of the muscle belly, in the region of SI 11.
  • To name two adjacent points and two distal points useful in treating the infraspinatous.
  • To name three related conditions that SI 11 may be effective in treating.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the infraspinatous muscle.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the infraspinatous muscle.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment - Demo of palpation of the infraspinatous, point location, and palpation of the muscle-tendon portion of the tendon.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of technique - needle technique of Small Intestine 11, Large Intestine 14, and technique for the muscle-tendon junction.

Frozen Shoulder: Pain and Decreased Range of Motion

Whitfield Reaves discusses the different methods used in treating Frozen Shoulder.
Total CPDs: 1
Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1), IVAS (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Frozen shoulder is not necessarily a precise medical diagnosis. In fact, the causes of frozen shoulder are not fully understood and texts differ in their description of the pathology. The process may involve a thickening and contracture of the capsule surrounding the shoulder joint. Some sources call the condition “adhesive capsulitis,” where adhesions within the joint are responsible for decreased mobility. Others suggest that synovial inflammation is causative. The work of Dr. Janet Travell looks at myofascial causes of frozen shoulder that result from trigger points and dysfunction of the subscapularis muscle. Sometimes associated with known etiology, such as capsular lesions, rotator cuff injury, or trauma, frozen shoulder may be as simple as a post-surgical occurrence. With all these different causes of dysfunction, it is no wonder that no single technique of acupuncture works a majority of the time. Whitfield Reaves will discuss some of the approaches he has found useful in treating this sometimes stubborn, clinical complaint. And while frozen shoulder may resist treatment at times, the practitioner needs to be fully aware of its causes, and thus, precise treatment may be better performed. Different complementary treatments, such as physical therapy, will also be discussed.

Course Objectives

  • To diagnose frozen shoulder from observation of signs, including range of motion.
  • To use palpation in order to assess affected muscles of the shoulder girdle.
  • To name three acupuncture points located on the affected muscles of the shoulder.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of the condition.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the soft tissue of the shoulder.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of frozen shoulder.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment: Demonstration of palpation of the shoulder girdle, point location, and orthopedic testing.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of technique: Small Intestine 11, 12, and needle technique for non-local points: Stomach 38, Small Intestine 6, Zongping.

Anterior Shoulder Pain - Biceps Muscle

Whitfield Reaves discusses the treatment and protocols used for treating Bicepital Tendonitis.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

The long head of the biceps, with its predictable stagnation in the bicepital groove, presents with pain in the anterior and anterior-lateral aspect of the shoulder. Pain may radiate down the biceps muscle of the forearm. For the acupuncture practitioner, this is an important injury with which to be acquainted. While not as common as rotator cuff injuries, bicepital lesions are overlooked by the acupuncturist. Diagnosis and assessment are not always definitive, and acupuncture treatment can be complicated. Furthermore, it does not help that there are no acupuncture points located at the site of the injury. Commonly diagnosed in the category of accident/trauma, biceps tendonitis is usually a repetitive stress disorder due to the accumulation of micro-trauma. However, it may occasionally occur as an acute strain. The injury is at the level of the muscles and tendons, with qi and blood stagnation in the channels and collaterals. Bicepital tendonitis usually presents as Lung meridian pathology and it generally responds to local needling or, in some cases, local cupping. Specific distal points complete the treatment and all of these protocols are thoroughly described in this one-hour webinar by Whitfield Reaves.

Course Objectives

  • To perform at least one orthopedic test and palpation that assist in the diagnosis of the condition.
  • To know two distal points that may be used in the treatment of bicepital pain.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local zone of the bicepital tendon.
  • To be able to describe cupping techniques in the local zone of the bicepital tendon.
  • To know 3 complementary muscles that may be treated when the biceps is the primary site of stagnation.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the biceps muscle.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the biceps muscle.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment - Demo of palpation of the area, point location, and palpation of the bicepital groove.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of technique - Needle technique of Lung 3, 4, 2, and technique for the bicepital groove.

AC Joint

Whitfield Reaves explains the treatment used for shoulder/AC separation, and why it is a commonly overlooked diagnosis.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Pain and inflammation on the top of the shoulder is usually due to pathology of the acromial-clavicular (AC) joint. Acutely, this is called a shoulder separation, and involves sprain to the acromial-clavicular ligament. Chronically, pain at this joint may simply be arthritis, and is diagnosed as a Bi syndrome. Because there is no defined point at the AC joint, the acupuncturist often overlooks this as a cause of shoulder pain, especially in the chronic state. Located between Large Intestine 16 on the medial aspect and Large Intestine 15 on the lateral aspect, these two points serve as effective adjacent sites for needling. However, this webinar will cover some very innovative treatments involving “threading the joint space” at Large Intestine 15.5. AC separation as well as chronic inflammation involves injury at the level of the ligaments, tendons, and the joint. There is qi and blood stagnation in the channels and collaterals. The Large Intestine is the primary meridian affected. Thus, in addition to the local and adjacent treatment, distal Yang-ming points may greatly assist in effective outcomes. In this webinar, Whitfield Reaves will discuss this often overlooked diagnosis, and cover the relatively simple details of acupuncture sports medicine techniques.

Course Objectives

  • To perform one orthopedic test and palpation that assists in the diagnosis of the condition.
  • To know two adjacent points that may be used in the treatment of the condition.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local zone of the AC joint.
  • To name two distal points that may be useful in an acute AC joint separation.
  • To describe the symptoms reported by the patient suffering from AC joint arthritis.
  • To know the signs and symptoms of shoulder separation, and when it is necessary to refer the patient for orthopedic evaluation.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Anatomy of the AC Joint.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical Assessment of the pathology of the AC Joint.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of Assessment techniques.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling technique for injuries of the AC joint.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Whitfield Reaves addresses the many conditions that surround Carpel Tunnel and simplifies it with Sports Medicine protocols.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Most acupuncture practitioners are familiar with the pain, tingling, and numbness in the palmar aspect of the hand and wrist seen in carpal tunnel syndrome. Often, it is a repetitive stress injury characterized by entrapment, compression, or irritation to the median nerve in its narrow passageway of the carpal tunnel at the wrist. However, this webinar will attempt to honestly address the complex issues that make its treatment with acupuncture sometimes quite frustrating for both the practitioner and the patient. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common type of compressive neuropathy seen in the clinic. Local treatment starts in the region of the point Pericardium 7; however, treatment for the carpal tunnel patient is never that simple, as there are often additional factors that contribute to the condition. Whitfield Reaves will discuss the complicated issues of carpal tunnel syndrome during this webinar, and will attempt to simplify this condition with various acupuncture sports medicine protocols.

Course Objectives

  • To diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome using two orthopedic tests.
  • To use palpation and observation to assess the stage of the condition.
  • To name three local and adjacent acupuncture points located at the site of injury.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • To describe the needle technique at PC 7, at the site of the carpal tunnel.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Review of the anatomy of the carpal tunnel.
15 min - 30 min
Describe the clinical assessment of the pathology of the carpal tunnel.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstratoin of assessment techniques.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling techniques to treat injuries of the carpal tunnel.

Tennis Elbow

Whitfield Reaves tackles the complexity of the anatomical structure that makes it difficult for needling for Tennis Elbow.
Total CPDs: 1
IVAS (1), Standard Certificate (1), NCCAOM (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Tennis elbow, or epicondylitis, presents with pain in the elbow at the lateral epicondyle and distally along the extensor tendon and muscles of the forearm. Usually a repetitive stress injury, it is characterized by inflammation and irritation of the forearm extensors and possibly the supinators. This is a typical sports injury, with the site of trauma occurring frequently on a yang surface (the extensors). It is much more common than medial epicondylitis, on the flexor muscle group of the yin surface. Like many overuse injuries, its onset is insidious. There is often no specific traumatic event associated with the start of symptoms. However, the patient is predictably involved in recreational activities that require repetitive and vigorous use of the forearm muscles – like tennis and other racquet sports. Occupational stresses, such as construction work, also result in the injury. Similarly, the effects of computer keyboarding and utilizing a mouse, can also act as a stress to the extensor group. The Large Intestine and San Jiao meridians encompass the region of the extensor muscles. However, neither of these two channels precisely encompass the lateral epicondyle. Hence, distal points may be difficult to determine, and the practitioner will need some “trick” techniques to treat this condition. As Whitfield Reaves will discuss in the webinar, the complexity of the anatomical structure of the common extensor tendon makes even local and adjacent needling more difficult than what some practitioners may want to admit.

Course Objectives

  • To perform two orthopedic tests that assist in the diagnosis of the condition.
  • To use palpation in order to diagnose the condition.
  • To know two non-local treatments that may be used in the treatment of the condition.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local zone of the epicondyle.
  • To be able to describe needle technique on the local zone of the extensor tendon.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Review the anatomy of the forearm and extensor muscles.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of the pathology of the extensor muscles.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment techniques.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling techniques.

Hip Bursitis

Whitfield Reaves illustrates the treatment of Trochanteric Bursitis and the use of Jian Kua, an extraordinary point.
Total CPDs: 1
NCCAOM (1), Standard Certificate (1), IVAS (1)
Access Period: Lifetime
Course Length: 1hrs
Course Notes: Notes are provided with this course.

Course Overview

Trochanteric bursitis presents as pain and stiffness in the hip and lateral thigh which may radiate down the ilio-tibial band. It is often a repetitive stress injury characterized by inflammation of the trochanteric bursa of the hip. Sometimes, it may occur from acute trauma. Hip bursitis usually involves the gluteal muscles and the ilio-tibial band. Treatment of the hip bursae, as shown in this webinar, skillfully combines local and adjacent points. Locally, there are various techniques to treat the bursae itself. And the adjacent muscles, including the gluteus medius, alert the practitioner to vitally important tissues where no traditional acupuncture points are located. Whitfield Reaves teaches that treatment of trochanteric bursitis is one of the very highly effective injuries, as it responds quite well to the techniques of acupuncture sports medicine. He will include instruction on the extraordinary point Jiankua, an extremely useful point in hip and gluteal conditions.

Course Objectives

  • To use palpation in order to diagnose the presence of inflammation of the trochanteric bursae.
  • To name one acupuncture point and one extraordinary point located locally or adjacent, in the gluteus medius muscle.
  • To name two acupuncture points located distal to the bursae.
  • To describe at least one technique used in the treatment of the bursae.
  • To describe treatment proximally to the gluteus medius muscle.

Course Outline

0 hrs - 15 min
Review anatomy of the hip.
15 min - 30 min
Clinical assessment of pathology of the hip.
30 min - 45 min
Demonstration of assessment techniques.
45 min - 1 hrs
Demonstration of needling techniques.
Whitfield is very methodical with his approach to treating injuries in the field of sports medicine. I am so grateful that he is sharing his experience, knowledge and wisdom that spans over 30 years. I particularly enjoyed his consistent approach to treatment with his 4 steps, 10 techniques. He is very humble and authentic in his approach when discussing his experiences. I look forward to learning from Whitfield Reaves in person!
Marianne T. - United States
Whitfield Reaves is a wonderful teacher giving all relevant information, staying on topic with great clinical stories and demonstrations to illustrate his material. I love the way he integrates modern western sports medicine wisdom with TCM methods.
Erica T. - United States
Whitfield Reeves shares many years of personal practiced wisdom and methods in the area of Acupuncture Sports Medicine. I appreciate the opportunity to learn and directly apply his focused treatments after viewing the online course options. The Acupuncture Handbook of Sports Injuries Pain is my go-to reference guide for any muscular/skeleton complaint.
Coleen F. - United States
Whitfield Reaves courses are so practical and useful in a clinical setting. Using his methods has been very effective for me getting results with patients. Every acupuncturist should take at least a couple of his courses.
Madison D. - Canada
Whitfield Reeves teaches his system in exactly the way I like to learn. The images are clear, he presents the information systematically, and the needling instruction is practical and useful.
Wendy B. - United States
I would highly recommend the Sport Webinar series to any acupuncturists, especially those working in chiropractic clinics so they can better complement their treatments and have a deeper understanding of joint pain and injuries
Christine O. - Canada
Whitfield Reaves always gives you that little bit of extra info in these presentations that you don't get from his book. I am thoroughly enjoying the series.
Melony C. - United States
Very well done: Organized, concise, fluent, practice based, humble , well spoken at a good pace.
Dan L. - United States

Disclaimers:

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Unlimited Access and CEUs
You will have unlimited access to this series for as long as it is on Net of Knowledge, so that you can keep reviewing and learning from it over the years. CEU requirements must be completed within 1 year from the purchase. During this time, you must view the training and complete any required documents to get your certificate. You must also print and save your certificate for your own records.
Cancellation Policy
Please note we do not offer refunds for our recorded online courses/webinars.
Note
These recordings are available in an online format only; you will not receive a DVD or physical copy of the recording – they are only available to watch on the internet through your online account.

Taught by Whitfield Reaves

In practice for over 30 years, Whitfield Reaves, OMD, L.Ac., specializes in the field of sports medicine. Being in the forefront of the acupuncture sports medicine field, Whitfield's experience includes working with athletes at the 1984 LA Olympic Games
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